Université PSL

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Innate control of actin nucleation determines two distinct migration behaviours in dendritic cells.
Laboratoire Biologie cellulaire systémique de la polarité et de la division - Vargas P, Maiuri P, Bretou M, Sáez PJ, Pierobon P, Maurin M, Chabaud M, Lankar D, Obino D, Terriac E, Raab M, Thiam H-R, Brocker T, Kitchen-Goosen SM, Alberts AS, Sunareni P, Xia S, Li R, Voituriez R, Piel M, Lennon-Duménil A-M
Nat. Cell Biol. - 18(1): 43-53 - DOI: 10.1016/j.jim.2015.12.005 - 2019
Dendritic cell (DC) migration in peripheral tissues serves two main functions: antigen sampling by immature DCs, and chemokine-guided migration towards lymphatic vessels (LVs) on maturation. These migratory events determine the efficiency of the adaptive immune response. Their regulation by the core cell locomotion machinery has not been determined. Here, we show that the migration of immature DCs depends on two main actin pools: a RhoA-mDia1-dependent actin pool located at their rear, which facilitates forward locomotion; and a Cdc42-Arp2/3-dependent actin pool present at their front, which limits migration but promotes antigen capture. Following TLR4-MyD88-induced maturation, Arp2/3-dependent actin enrichment at the cell front is markedly reduced. Consequently, mature DCs switch to a faster and more persistent mDia1-dependent locomotion mode that facilitates chemotactic migration to LVs and lymph nodes. Thus, the differential use of actin-nucleating machineries optimizes the migration of immature and mature DCs according to their specific function.
Optical volume and mass measurements show that mammalian cells swell during mitosis.
Laboratoire Biologie cellulaire systémique de la polarité et de la division - Zlotek-Zlotkiewicz E, Monnier S, Cappello G, Le Berre M, Piel M
J. Cell Biol. - 211( 4): 765-74 - DOI: 10.1016/j.jim.2015.12.005 - 2019
The extent, mechanism, and function of cell volume changes during specific cellular events, such as cell migration and cell division, have been poorly studied, mostly because of a lack of adequate techniques. Here we unambiguously report that a large range of mammalian cell types display a significant increase in volume during mitosis (up to 30%). We further show that this increase in volume is tightly linked to the mitotic state of the cell and not to its spread or rounded shape and is independent of the presence of an intact actomyosin cortex. Importantly, this volume increase is not accompanied by an increase in dry mass and thus corresponds to a decrease in cell density. This mitotic swelling might have important consequences for mitotic progression: it might contribute to produce strong pushing forces, allowing mitotic cells to round up; it might also, by lowering cytoplasmic density, contribute to the large change of physicochemical properties observed in mitotic cells.
Actin Flows Mediate a Universal Coupling between Cell Speed and Cell Persistence.
Laboratoire Biologie cellulaire systémique de la polarité et de la division - Maiuri P, Rupprecht J-F, Wieser S, Ruprecht V, Bénichou O, Carpi N, Coppey M, De Beco S, Gov N, Heisenberg C-P, Lage Crespo C, Lautenschlaeger F, Le Berre M, Lennon-Dumenil A-M, Raab M, Thiam H-R, Piel M, Sixt M, Voituriez R
Cell - 161(2) 374-86 - DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2015.01.056 - 2019
Cell movement has essential functions in development, immunity, and cancer. Various cell migration patterns have been reported, but no general rule has emerged so far. Here, we show on the basis of experimental data in vitro and in vivo that cell persistence, which quantifies the straightness of trajectories, is robustly coupled to cell migration speed. We suggest that this universal coupling constitutes a generic law of cell migration, which originates in the advection of polarity cues by an actin cytoskeleton undergoing flows at the cellular scale. Our analysis relies on a theoretical model that we validate by measuring the persistence of cells upon modulation of actin flow speeds and upon optogenetic manipulation of the binding of an actin regulator to actin filaments. Beyond the quantitative prediction of the coupling, the model yields a generic phase diagram of cellular trajectories, which recapitulates the full range of observed migration patterns.
Deterministic patterns in cell motility
Laboratoire Biologie cellulaire systémique de la polarité et de la division - Ido Lavi, Matthieu Piel, Ana-Maria Lennon-Duménil , Raphaël Voituriez and Nir S. Gov
Nature Physics - 12 1146–1152 - DOI: : 10.1038/NPHYS3836 - 2019
Cell migration paths are generally described as random walks, associated with both intrinsic and extrinsic noise. However, complex cell locomotion is not merely related to such fluctuations, but is often determined by the underlying machinery. Cell motility is driven mechanically by actin and myosin, two molecular components that generate contractile forces. Other cell functions make use of the same components and, therefore, will compete with the migratory apparatus. Here, we propose a physical model of such a competitive system, namely dendritic cells whose antigen capture function and migratory ability are coupled by myosin II. The model predicts that this coupling gives rise to a dynamic instability, whereby cells switch from persistent migration to unidirectional self-oscillation, through a Hopf bifurcation. Cells can then switch to periodic polarity reversals through a homoclinic bifurcation. These predicted dynamic regimes are characterized by robust features that we identify through in vitro trajectories of dendritic cells over long timescales and distances. We expect that competition for limited resources in other migrating cell types can lead to similar deterministic migration modes.
Polarization of Myosin II Refines Tissue Material Properties to Buffer Mechanical Stress.
Laboratoire Biologie cellulaire systémique de la polarité et de la division - Duda M, Kirkland NJ, Khalilgharibi N, Tozluoglu M, Yuen AC, Carpi N, Bove A, Piel M, Charras G, Baum B, Mao Y.
Dev Cell - 48(2) 245-260. - doi: 10.1016/j.devcel.2018.12.020. - 2019
As tissues develop, they are subjected to a variety of mechanical forces. Some of these forces are instrumental in the development of tissues, while others can result in tissue damage. Despite our extensive understanding of force-guided morphogenesis, we have only a limited understanding of how tissues prevent further morphogenesis once the shape is determined after development. Here, through the development of a tissue-stretching device, we uncover a mechanosensitive pathway that regulates tissue responses to mechanical stress through the polarization of actomyosin across the tissue. We show that stretch induces the formation of linear multicellular actomyosin cables, which depend on Diaphanous for their nucleation. These stiffen the epithelium, limiting further changes in shape, and prevent fractures from propagating across the tissue. Overall, this mechanism of force-induced changes in tissue mechanical properties provides a general model of force buffering that serves to preserve the shape of tissues under conditions of mechanical stress.
Myosin II Activity Is Selectively Needed for Migration in Highly Confined Microenvironments in Mature Dendritic Cells.
Laboratoire Biologie cellulaire systémique de la polarité et de la division - Lucie Barbier, Pablo J Sáez, Rafaele Attia, Ana-Maria Lennon-Duménil, Ido Lavi, Matthieu Piel, Pablo Vargas
Frontiers in immunology - 747 - DOI : 10.3389/fimmu.2019.00747 - 2019
Upon infection, mature dendritic cells (mDCs) migrate from peripheral tissue to lymph nodes (LNs) to activate T lymphocytes and initiate the adaptive immune response. This fast and tightly regulated process is tuned by different microenvironmental factors, such as the physical properties of the tissue. Mechanistically, mDCs migration mostly relies on acto-myosin flow and contractility that depend on non-muscular Myosin IIA (MyoII) activity. However, the specific contribution of this molecular motor for mDCs navigation in complex microenvironments has yet to be fully established. Here, we identified a specific role of MyoII activity in the regulation of mDCs migration in highly confined microenvironments. Using microfluidic systems, we observed that during mDCs chemotaxis in 3D collagen gels under defined CCL21 gradients, MyoII activity was required to sustain their fast speed but not to orientate them toward the chemokine. Indeed, despite the fact that mDCs speed declined, these cells still migrated through the 3D gels, indicating that this molecular motor has a discrete function during their motility in this irregular microenvironment. Consistently, using microchannels of different sizes, we found that MyoII activity was essential to maintain fast cell speed specifically under strong confinement. Analysis of cell motility through micrometric holes further demonstrated that cell contractility facilitated mDCs passage only over very small gaps. Altogether, this work highlights that high contractility acts as an adaptation mechanism exhibited by mDCs to optimize their motility in restricted landscapes. Hence, MyoII activity ultimately facilitates their navigation in highly confined areas of structurally irregular tissues, contributing to the fine-tuning of their homing to LNs to initiate adaptive immune responses.
Innate Immune Signals Induce Anterograde Endosome Transport Promoting MHC Class I Cross-Presentation.
Laboratoire Biologie cellulaire systémique de la polarité et de la division - Weimershaus M, Mauvais FX, Saveanu L, Adiko C, Babdor J, Abramova A, Montealegre S, Lawand M, Evnouchidou I, Huber KJ, Chadt A, Zwick M, Vargas P, Dussiot M, Lennon-Dumenil AM, Brocker T, Al-Hasani H, van Endert P.
Cell Reports - 24(13) 3568-3581 - doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2018.08.041 - 2018
Both cross-presentation of antigens by dendritic cells, a key pathway triggering T cell immunity and immune tolerance, and survival of several pathogens residing in intracellular vacuoles are intimately linked to delayed maturation of vesicles containing internalized antigens and microbes. However, how early endosome or phagosome identity is maintained is incompletely understood. We show that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and Fc receptor ligation induces interaction of the GTPase Rab14 with the kinesin KIF16b mediating plus-end-directed microtubule transport of endosomes. As a result, Rab14 recruitment to phagosomes delays their maturation and killing of an internalized pathogen. Enhancing anterograde transport by overexpressing Rab14, promoting the GTP-bound Rab14 state, or inhibiting retrograde transport upregulates cross-presentation. Conversely, reducing Rab14 expression, destabilizing Rab14 endosomes, and inhibiting anterograde microtubule transport by Kif16b knockdown compromise cross-presentation. Therefore, regulation of early endosome trafficking by innate immune signals is a critical parameter in cross-presentation by dendritic cells.
Diversification of human plasmacytoid predendritic cells in response to a single stimulus
Laboratoire Biologie cellulaire systémique de la polarité et de la division - Alculumbre SG, Saint-André V1, Di Domizio J, Vargas P, Sirven P, Bost P, Maurin M, Maiuri P, Wery M, Roman MS, Savey L, Touzot M, Terrier B, Saadoun D, Conrad C, Gilliet M, Morillon A, Soumelis V.
Nat Immunol. - 19(1) 63-75 - doi: 10.1038/s41590-017-0012-z - 2018
Innate immune cells adjust to microbial and inflammatory stimuli through a process termed environmental plasticity, which links a given individual stimulus to a unique activated state. Here, we report that activation of human plasmacytoid predendritic cells (pDCs) with a single microbial or cytokine stimulus triggers cell diversification into three stable subpopulations (P1-P3). P1-pDCs (PD-L1+CD80-) displayed a plasmacytoid morphology and specialization for type I interferon production. P3-pDCs (PD-L1-CD80+) adopted a dendritic morphology and adaptive immune functions. P2-pDCs (PD-L1+CD80+) displayed both innate and adaptive functions. Each subpopulation expressed a specific coding- and long-noncoding-RNA signature and was stable after secondary stimulation. P1-pDCs were detected in samples from patients with lupus or psoriasis. pDC diversification was independent of cell divisions or preexisting heterogeneity within steady-state pDCs but was controlled by a TNF autocrine and/or paracrine communication loop. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism for diversity and division of labor in innate immune cells.
Spontaneous migration of cellular aggregates from giant keratocytes to running spheroids
Laboratoire Biologie cellulaire systémique de la polarité et de la division - Grégory Beaune, Carles Blanch-Mercader, Stéphane Douezan, Julien Dumond, David Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Damien Cuvelier, Thierry Ondarçuhu, Pierre Sens, Sylvie Dufour, Michael P. Murrell, and Françoise Brochard-Wyart
Cell Sci - 115 (51) 12926-12931 - doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1811348115 - 2018
Despite extensive knowledge on the mechanisms that drive single-cell migration, those governing the migration of cell clusters, as occurring during embryonic development and cancer metastasis, remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the collective migration of cell on adhesive gels with variable rigidity, using 3D cellular aggregates as a model system. After initial adhesion to the substrate, aggregates spread by expanding outward a cell monolayer, whose dynamics is optimal in a narrow range of rigidities. Fast expansion gives rise to the accumulation of mechanical tension that leads to the rupture of cell–cell contacts and the nucleation of holes within the monolayer, which becomes unstable and undergoes dewetting like a liquid film. This leads to a symmetry breaking and causes the entire aggregate to move as a single entity. Varying the substrate rigidity modulates the extent of dewetting and induces different modes of aggregate motion: “giant keratocytes,” where the lamellipodium is a cell monolayer that expands at the front and retracts at the back; “penguins,” characterized by bipedal locomotion; and “running spheroids,” for nonspreading aggregates. We characterize these diverse modes of collective migration by quantifying the flows and forces that drive them, and we unveil the fundamental physical principles that govern these behaviors, which underscore the biological predisposition of living material to migrate, independent of length scale.
Adhesion to nanofibers drives cell membrane remodeling through one-dimensional wetting.
Laboratoire Biologie cellulaire systémique de la polarité et de la division - Arthur Charles-Orszag, Feng-Ching Tsai, Daria Bonazzi, Valeria Manriquez, Martin Sachse, Adeline Mallet, Audrey Salles, Keira Melican, Ralitza Staneva, Aurélie Bertin, Corinne Millien, Sylvie Goussard, Pierre Lafaye, Spencer Shorte, Matthieu Piel, Jacomi
Nature Communications - 185.41666667 - Adhesion to nanofibers drives cell membrane remodeling through one-dimensional wetting. - 2018
The shape of cellular membranes is highly regulated by a set of conserved mechanisms that can be manipulated by bacterial pathogens to infect cells. Remodeling of the plasma membrane of endothelial cells by the bacterium Neisseria meningitidis is thought to be essential during the blood phase of meningococcal infection, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we show that plasma membrane remodeling occurs independently of F-actin, along meningococcal type IV pili fibers, by a physical mechanism that we term ‘one-dimensional’ membrane wetting. We provide a theoretical model that describes the physical basis of one-dimensional wetting and show that this mechanism occurs in model membranes interacting with nanofibers, and in human cells interacting with extracellular matrix meshworks. We propose one-dimensional wetting as a new general principle driving the interaction of cells with their environment at the nanoscale that is diverted by meningococci during infection.

66 publications.