Université PSL

Publications

RECHERCHER

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Inkjet Printing of Latex‐Based High‐Energy Microcapacitors
Chasing Aqueous Biphasic Systems from Simple Salts by Exploring the LiTFSI/LiCl/H2O Phase Diagram N Dubouis, C Park, M Deschamps, S Abdelghani-Idrissi, M Kanduč, ... ACS Central Science 5 (4), 640-643
Advanced Functional Materials - 1901884 - - 2019
Microenergy storage devices are appealing and highly demanded for diverse miniaturized electronic devices, ranging from microelectromechanical system, robotics, to sensing microsystems and wearable electronics. However, making high‐energy microcapacitors with currently available printing technologies remains challenging. Herein, the possibility to use latex polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as aqueous ink for making dielectric capacitors at the microscale is shown. The dielectric properties of printed microcapacitors can be optimized based on a novel approach, i.e., mixing PVDF latex with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to realize dielectric organic nanocomposites. The PVA prevents the coalescence of PVDF nanoparticles and serves as a continuous matrix phase with high dielectric breakdown strength. While the well‐dispersed PVDF nanoparticles serve as highly polarizable and isolated domains, providing large
A new way to measure viscosity in droplet-based microfluidics for high throughput analysis
Estelle André, Nicolas Pannacci, Christine Dalmazzone, Annie Colin
Soft Matter - 3 504-514 - - 2019
In this work, we propose a new way to measure the viscosity of samples in a microfluidic device. By analysing the shape of droplets after an expansion, we can measure the viscosity of the phase inside the droplet knowing the surface tension between the two liquids, the flow rate, the geometry of the channel and the viscosity of the continuous phase. This work paves the way for future high throughput studies in the framework of digital microfluidics.
Microfluidic model of the platelet-generating organ: beyond bone marrow biomimetics
Antoine Blin, Anne Le Goff, Aurélie Magniez, Sonia Poirault-Chassac, Bruno Teste, Géraldine Sicot, Kim Anh Nguyen, Feriel S. Hamdi, Mathilde Reyssat & Dominique Baruch
Nature - Scientific Reports 6 21700 - DOI: 10.1038/srep21700 - 2019
We present a new, rapid method for producing blood platelets in vitro from cultured megakaryocytes based on a microfluidic device. This device consists in a wide array of VWF-coated micropillars. Such pillars act as anchors on megakaryocytes, allowing them to remain trapped in the device and subjected to hydrodynamic shear. The combined effect of anchoring and shear induces the elongation of megakaryocytes and finally their rupture into platelets and proplatelets. This process was observed with megakaryocytes from different origins and found to be robust. This original bioreactor design allows to process megakaryocytes at high throughput (millions per hour). Since platelets are produced in such a large amount, their extensive biological characterisation is possible and shows that platelets produced in this bioreactor are functional.
Droplet generation at Hele-Shaw microfluidic T-junction
I. Chakraborty, J. Ricouvier, P. Yazghur, P. Tabeling, A. Leshansky
Phys. Fluids - 31(2) 022010 - - 2019
Foam as a self-assembling amorphous photonic band gap material
View ORCID ProfileJoshua Ricouvier, Patrick Tabeling, and Pavel Yazhgur
Phys. Fluids - 116 (19) 9202-9207 - doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1820526116 - 2019
We show that slightly polydisperse disordered 2D foams can be used as a self-assembled template for isotropic photonic band gap (PBG) materials for transverse electric (TE) polarization. Calculations based on in-house experimental and simulated foam structures demonstrate that, at sufficient refractive index contrast, a dry foam organization with threefold nodes and long slender Plateau borders is especially advantageous to open a large PBG. A transition from dry to wet foam structure rapidly closes the PBG mainly by formation of bigger fourfold nodes, filling the PBG with defect modes. By tuning the foam area fraction, we find an optimal quantity of dielectric material, which maximizes the PBG in experimental systems. The obtained results have a potential to be extended to 3D foams to produce a next generation of self-assembled disordered PBG materials, enabling fabrication of cheap and scalable photonic devices.
Droplet generation at Hele-Shaw microfluidic T-junction
I. Chakraborty, J. Ricouvier, P. Yazhgur, P. Tabeling, and A. M. Leshansky,
Phys. Fluids - 31 2 - doi.org/10.1063/1.5086808 - 2019
We proposed the combined numerical and experimental study of the dynamics of droplets generation at shallow microfluidic T-junction, where the flow is strongly confined in the vertical direction. The numerical simulation is performed by employing quasi-2D Hele-Shaw approximation with an interface capturing procedure based on coupled Level-Set and Volume-of-Fluid methods. We investigate the effect of the capillary number, Ca, the channel geometry (cross section aspect ratio, χ), and the flow rate (disperse-to-continuous phases) ratio, Γ, on the dynamics of the droplet breakup. Depending on Ca, three distinct flow regimes are identified: squeezing, tearing and jetting. In the squeezing regime at low Ca, the size of the generated droplets depends on χ and Γ, while it is almost insensitive to Ca in agreement to previous studies. In the tearing regime at moderate Ca, the droplet size decreases as ∼Ca−1/3, while it is only a weak function of χ and Γ. Finally, in the jetting regime, the steady co-flow of both phases takes place at high enough Ca. The numerical predictions based on the Hele-Shaw flow approximation are in excellent agreement with our in-house experimental results, demonstrating that the proposed approach can be effectively used for computationally inexpensive and adequately accurate modeling of biphasic flows in shallow microfluidic devices.
Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes
Eleonora Secchi, Sophie Marbach, Antoine Niguès, Derek Stein, Alessandro Siria & Lydéric Bocquet
Nature - 537 210–213 - DOI: 10.1038/nature19315 - 2019
Measurements and simulations have found that water moves through carbon nanotubes at exceptionally high rates owing to nearly frictionless interfaces1, 2, 3, 4. These observations have stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for applications including desalination, nano-filtration and energy harvesting5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, yet the exact mechanisms of water transport inside the nanotubes and at the water–carbon interface continue to be debated11, 12 because existing theories do not provide a satisfactory explanation for the limited number of experimental results available so far13. This lack of experimental results arises because, even though controlled and systematic studies have explored transport through individual nanotubes7, 8, 9, 14, 15, 16, 17, none has met the considerable technical challenge of unambiguously measuring the permeability of a single nanotube11. Here we show that the pressure-driven flow rate through individual nanotubes can be determined with unprecedented sensitivity and without dyes from the hydrodynamics of water jets as they emerge from single nanotubes into a surrounding fluid. Our measurements reveal unexpectedly large and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes, and no slippage in boron nitride nanotubes that are crystallographically similar to carbon nanotubes, but electronically different. This pronounced contrast between the two systems must originate from subtle differences in the atomic-scale details of their solid–liquid interfaces, illustrating that nanofluidics is the frontier at which the continuum picture of fluid mechanics meets the atomic nature of matter.
New avenues for the large scale harvesting of blue energy
A. Siria and L. Bocquet
Nature Chemistry - 1 91 - DOI: 10.1038/s41570-017-0091 - 2019
Salinity gradients have been identified as promising clean, renewable and non-intermittent sources of energy — so-called blue energy. However, the low efficiency of current harvesting technologies is a major limitation for large-scale viability and is mostly due to the low performances of the membrane processes currently in use. Advances in materials fabrication with dedicated chemical properties can resolve this bottleneck and lead to a new class of membranes for blue-energy conversion. In this Perspective, we briefly present current technologies for the conversion of blue energy, describe their performances and note their limitations. We then discuss new avenues for the development of a new class of membranes, combining considerations in nanoscale fluid dynamics and surface chemistry. Finally, we discuss how new functionalities originating from the exotic behaviour of fluids in the nanoscale regime can further boost energy conversion, making osmotic energy a tangible, clean alternative.
Pairwise frictional profile between particles determines discontinuous shear thickening transition in non‐colloidal suspensions
J. Comtet, G. Chatté, A. Niguès, L. Bocquet, A. Siria, and A. Colin
Nat Commun - 8 15633 - DOI: 10.1038/ncomms15633 - 2019
The process by which sheared suspensions go through a dramatic change in viscosity is known as discontinuous shear thickening. Although well-characterized on the macroscale, the microscopic mechanisms at play in this transition are still poorly understood. Here, by developing new experimental procedures based on quartz-tuning fork atomic force microscopy, we measure the pairwise frictional profile between approaching pairs of polyvinyl chloride and cornstarch particles in solvent. We report a clear transition from a low-friction regime, where pairs of particles support a finite normal load, while interacting purely hydrodynamically, to a high-friction regime characterized by hard repulsive contact between the particles and sliding friction. Critically, we show that the normal stress needed to enter the frictional regime at nanoscale matches the critical stress at which shear thickening occurs for macroscopic suspensions. Our experiments bridge nano and macroscales and provide long needed demonstration of the role of frictional forces in discontinuous shear thickening.
Contact dependence and velocity crossover in friction between microscopic solid/solid contacts
McGraw, A. Niguès, A. Chennevière, A. Siria
Nano Lett. - 17 (10) 6335–6339 - DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b03076 - 2019
Friction at the nanoscale differs markedly from that between surfaces of macroscopic extent. Characteristically, the velocity dependence of friction between apparent solid/solid contacts can strongly deviate from the classically assumed velocity independence. Here, we show that a nondestructive friction between solid tips with radius on the scale of hundreds of nanometers and solid hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers has a strong velocity dependence. Specifically, using laterally oscillating quartz tuning forks, we observe a linear scaling in the velocity at the lowest accessed velocities, typically hundreds of micrometers per second, crossing over into a logarithmic velocity dependence. This crossover is consistent with a general multicontact friction model that includes thermally activated breaking of the contacts at subnanometric elongation. We find as well a strong dependence of the friction on the dimensions of the frictional probe.

400 publications.