Université PSL

Publications

RECHERCHER

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Charge-based characterization of nanometric cationic bifunctional maghemite/silica core/shell particles by capillary zone electrophoresis
Laboratoire Synthèse, Electrochimie, Imagerie et Systèmes Analytiques... - d'Orlye F, Varenne A, Georgelin T, Siaugue JM, Teste B, Descroix S, Gareil P
Electrophoresis - 30(14) :2572-82 - DOI:10.1002/elps.200800835. - 2009
In view of employing functionalized nanoparticles (NPs) in the context of an immunodiagnostic, aminated maghemite/silica core/shell particles were synthesized so as to be further coated with an antibody or an antigen via the amino groups at their surface. Different functionalization rates were obtained by coating these maghemite/silica core/shell particles with 3-(aminopropyl)triethoxysilane and 2-[methoxy(polyethyleneoxy)propyl]-trimethoxysilane at different molar ratios. Adequate analytical performances with CE coupled with UV-visible detection were obtained through semi-permanent capillary coating with didodecyldimethyl-ammonium bromide, thus preventing particle adsorption. First, the influence of experimental conditions such as electric field strength, injected particle amount as well as electrolyte ionic strength and pH, was evaluated. A charge-dependent electrophoretic mobility was evidenced and the separation selectivity was tuned according to electrolyte ionic strength and pH. The best resolutions were obtained at pH 8.0, high ionic strength (ca. 100 mM), and low total particle volume fraction (ca. 0.055%), thus eliminating interference effects between different particle populations in mixtures. A protocol derived from Kaiser's original description was performed for quantitation of the primary amino groups attached onto the NP surface. Thereafter a correlation between particle electrophoretic mobility and the density of amino groups at their surface was established. Eventually, CE proved to be an easy, fast, and reliable method for the determination of NP effective surface charge density.
Droplet-based microfluidic platforms for the encapsulation and screening of mammalian cells and multicellular organisms
Laboratoire Biochimie - J. Clausell-Tormos, D. Lieber, J.-C. Baret, A. El-Harrak, O.J. Miller, L. Frenz, J. Blouwolff, K.J. Humphry, S. Köster, H. Duan, C. Holtze, D.A. Weitz, A.D. Griffiths and C.A. Merten
Chem. Biol. - 15(5) :427-37 - DOI: 10.1016/j.chembiol.2008.04.004 - 2008
High-throughput, cell-based assays require small sample volumes to reduce assay costs and to allow for rapid sample manipulation. However, further miniaturization of conventional microtiter plate technology is problematic due to evaporation and capillary action. To overcome these limitations, we describe droplet-based microfluidic platforms in which cells are grown in aqueous microcompartments separated by an inert perfluorocarbon carrier oil. Synthesis of biocompatible surfactants and identification of gas-permeable storage systems allowed human cells, and even a multicellular organism (C. elegans), to survive and proliferate within the microcompartments for several days. Microcompartments containing single cells could be reinjected into a microfluidic device after incubation to measure expression of a reporter gene. This should open the way for high-throughput, cell-based screening that can use >1000-fold smaller assay volumes and has approximately 500x higher throughput than conventional microtiter plate assays.
Droplet-based microreactors for the synthesis of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Angewandte
Laboratoire Biochimie - L. Frenz, A. El Harrak, M. Pauly, S. Bégin-Colin, A.D. Griffiths and J.-C. Baret
Chimie Int. Ed. - 47(36) :6817-20 - DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801360 - 2008
Microdroplets for nanoparticles: An extremely reliable method to create droplet pairs, based on hydrodynamic coupling of two spatially separated nozzles, has been developed. Droplets containing the reagents for the precipitation of iron oxide are electrocoalesced to synthesize iron oxide nanoparticles in a very fast (millisecond-scale) and reproducible reaction (see picture).
Flourescence-activated droplet sorting (FADS): efficient microfluidic cell sorting based on enzymatic activity
Laboratoire Biochimie - J.-C. Baret, O.J. Miller, V. Taly, M. Ryckelynck, A. El-Harrak, L. Frenz, C. Rick, M.L. Samuels, J. B. Hutchison, J.J. Agresti, D.R. Link, D.A. Weitz and A.D. Griffiths
Lab. Chip - 9 :1850-8 - DOI: 10.1039/B902504A - 2008
We describe a highly efficient microfluidic fluorescence-activated droplet sorter (FADS) combining many of the advantages of microtitre-plate screening and traditional fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Single cells are compartmentalized in emulsion droplets, which can be sorted using dielectrophoresis in a fluorescence-activated manner (as in FACS) at rates up to 2000 droplets s−1. To validate the system, mixtures of E. coli cells, expressing either the reporter enzyme β-galactosidase or an inactive variant, were compartmentalized with a fluorogenic substrate and sorted at rates of 300 droplets s−1. The false positive error rate of the sorter at this throughput was <1 in 104 droplets. Analysis of the sorted cells revealed that the primary limit to enrichment was the co-encapsulation of E. coli cells, not sorting errors: a theoretical model based on the Poisson distribution accurately predicted the observed enrichment values using the starting cell density (cells per droplet) and the ratio of active to inactive cells. When the cells were encapsulated at low density ( 1 cell for every 50 droplets), sorting was very efficient and all of the recovered cells were the active strain. In addition, single active droplets were sorted and cells were successfully recovered.
Regulation of dendritic cell migration by CD74, the MHC class II-associated invariant chain
Laboratoire Biologie cellulaire systémique de la polarité et de la division - Faure-André G, Vargas P, Yuseff MI, Heuzé M, Diaz J, Lankar D, Steri V, Manry J, Hugues S, Vascotto F, Boulanger J, Raposo G, Bono MR, Rosemblatt M, Piel M, Lennon-Duménil AM
Science - 322(5908) :1705-10 - DOI:10.1126/science.1159894 - 2008
Dendritic cells (DCs) sample peripheral tissues of the body in search of antigens to present to T cells. This requires two processes, antigen processing and cell motility, originally thought to occur independently. We found that the major histocompatibility complex II-associated invariant chain (Ii or CD74), a known regulator of antigen processing, negatively regulates DC motility in vivo. By using microfabricated channels to mimic the confined environment of peripheral tissues, we found that wild-type DCs alternate between high and low motility, whereas Ii-deficient cells moved in a faster and more uniform manner. The regulation of cell motility by Ii depended on the actin-based motor protein myosin II. Coupling antigen processing and cell motility may enable DCs to more efficiently detect and process antigens within a defined space.
Physical mechanisms redirecting cell polarity and cell shape in fission yeast
Laboratoire Biologie cellulaire systémique de la polarité et de la division - Terenna CR, Makushok T, Velve-Casquillas G, Baigl D, Chen Y, Bornens M, Paoletti A, Piel M, Tran PT
Curr Biol. - 18(22) :1748-53 - DOI:10.1016/j.cub.2008.09.047. - 2008
The cylindrical rod shape of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is organized and maintained by interactions between the microtubule, cell membrane, and actin cytoskeleton [1]. Mutations affecting any components in this pathway lead to bent, branched, or round cells [2]. In this context, the cytoskeleton controls cell polarity and thus dictates cell shape. Here, we use soft-lithography techniques to construct microfluidic channels to control cell shape. We show that when wild-type rod-shaped cells are physically forced to grow in a bent fashion, they will reorganize their cytoskeleton and redirect cell polarity to make new ectopic cell tips. Moreover, when bent or round mutant cells are physically forced to conform to the wild-type rod-shape, they will reverse their mutational phenotypes by reorganizing their cytoskeleton to maintain proper wild-type-like localization of microtubules, cell-membrane proteins, and actin. Our study provides direct evidence that the cytoskeleton controls cell polarity and cell shape and demonstrates that cell shape also controls the organization of the cytoskeleton in a feedback loop. We present a model of the feedback loop to explain how fission yeast maintain a rod shape and how perturbation of specific parameters of the loop can lead to different cell shapes.
Chiral Colloidal Clusters
Laboratoire Colloïdes et Matériaux Divisés - D. Zerrouki, J. Baudry, D. Pine, P. Chaikin, J. Bibette
Nature - 455 :380-2 - DOI:10.1038/nature07237 - 2008
Chirality is an important element of biology, chemistry and physics. Once symmetry is broken and a handedness is established, biochemical pathways are set. In DNA, the double helix arises from the existence of two competing length scales, one set by the distance between monomers in the sugar backbone, and the other set by the stacking of the base pairs1. Here we use a colloidal system to explore a simple forcing route to chiral structures. To do so we have designed magnetic colloids that, depending on both their shape and induced magnetization, self-assemble with controlled helicity. We model the two length scales with asymmetric colloidal dumbbells linked by a magnetic belt at their waist. In the presence of a magnetic field the belts assemble into a chain and the steric constraints imposed by the asymmetric spheres force the chain to coil. We show that if the size ratio between the spheres is large enough, a single helicity is adopted, right or left. The realization of chiral colloidal clusters opens up a new link between colloidal science and chemistry. These colloidal clusters may also find use as mesopolymers, as optical and light-activated structures2, and as models for enantiomeric separation.
Decompressing Emulsion Droplets Favors Coalescence
Laboratoire Colloïdes et Matériaux Divisés - N. Brémond, A.R. Thiam, J. Bibette
Phys. Rev. Lett. - 100(2) :024501 - DOI:10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.024501 - 2008
The destabilization process of an emulsion under flow is investigated in a microfluidic device. The experimental approach enables us to generate a periodic train of droplet pairs, and thus to isolate and analyze the basic step of the destabilization, namely, the coalescence of two droplets which collide. We demonstrate a counterintuitive phenomenon: coalescence occurs during the separation phase and not during the impact. Separation induces the formation of two facing nipples in the contact area that hastens the connection of the interfaces prior to fusion. Moreover, droplet pairs initially stabilized by surfactants can be destabilized by forcing the separation. Finally, we note that the fusion mechanism is responsible for a cascade of coalescence events in a compact system of droplets where the separation is driven by surface tension.
Measuring the kinetics of biomolecular recognition with magnetic colloids
Laboratoire Colloïdes et Matériaux Divisés - L. Cohen-Tannoudji, E. Bertrand, J. Baudry, C. Robic, C. Goubault, M. Pellissier, A. Johner, F. Thalmann, N. K. Lee, C. M. Marques, J. Bibette
Phys. Rev. Lett. - 100(10) :108301 - DOI:10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.108301 - 2008
We introduce a general methodology based on magnetic colloids to study the recognition kinetics of tethered biomolecules. Access to the full kinetics of the reaction is provided by an explicit measure of the time evolution of the reactant densities. Binding between a single ligand and its complementary receptor is here limited by the colloidal rotational diffusion. It occurs within a binding distance that can be extracted by a reaction-diffusion theory that properly accounts for the rotational Brownian dynamics. Our reaction geometry allows us to probe a large diversity of bioadhesive molecules and tethers, thus providing a quantitative guidance for designing more efficient reactive biomimetic surfaces, as required for diagnostic, therapeutic, and tissue engineering techniques.
Microfluidic high-throughput encapsulation and hydrodynamic self-sorting of single cells
Laboratoire Macromolécules et Microsystèmes en Biologie et Médecine - Chabert M and Viovy JL
Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA - 105(9) :3191-6 - DOI:10.1073/pnas.0708321105 - 2008
We present a purely hydrodynamic method for the high-throughput encapsulation of single cells into picoliter droplets, and spontaneous self-sorting of these droplets. Encapsulation uses a cell-triggered Rayleigh-Plateau instability in a flow-focusing geometry, and self-sorting puts to work two extra hydrodynamic mechanisms: lateral drift of deformable objects in a shear flow, and sterically driven dispersion in a compressional flow. Encapsulation and sorting are achieved on-flight in continuous flow at a rate up to 160 cells per second. The whole process is robust and cost-effective, involving no optical or electrical discrimination, active sorting, flow switching, or moving parts. Successful encapsulation and sorting of 70-80% of the injected cell population into drops containing one and only one cell, with <1% contamination by empty droplets, is demonstrated. The system is also applied to the direct encapsulation and sorting of cancerous lymphocytes from a whole blood mixture, yielding individually encapsulated cancer cells with a >10,000-fold enrichment as compared with the initial mix. The method can be implemented in simple “soft lithography” chips, allowing for easy downstream coupling with microfluidic cell biology or molecular biology protocols.

410 publications.