Université PSL

Publications

RECHERCHER

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Nano-on-Micro Fibrous Extracellular Matrices for Scalable Expansion of Human Es/Ips Cells
L. Liu, K.-i. Kamei, M. Yoshioka, M. Nakajima, J. Li, N. Fujimoto, S. Terada, Y. Tokunaga, Y. Koyama, H. Sato, K. Hasegawa, N. Nakatsuji and Y. Chen
Biomaterials - 124 47-54 - DOI: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2017.01.039 - 2019
Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) hold great potential for industrial and clinical applications. Clinical-grade scaffolds and high-quality hPSCs are required for cell expansion as well as easy handling and manipulation of the products. Current hPSC culture methods do not fulfill these requirements because of a lack of proper extracellular matrices (ECMs) and cell culture wares. We developed a layered nano-on-micro fibrous cellular matrix mimicking ECM, named "fiber-on-fiber (FF)" matrix, which enables easy handling and manipulation of cultured cells. While non-woven sheets of cellulose and polyglycolic acid were used as a microfiber layer facilitating mechanical stability, electrospun gelatin nanofibers were crosslinked on the microfiber layer, generating a mesh structure with connected nanofibers facilitating cell adhesion and growth. Our results showed that the FF matrix supports effective hPSC culture with maintenance of their pluripotency and normal chromosomes over two months, as well as effective scaled-up expansion, with fold increases of 54.1 ± 15.6 and 40.4 ± 8.4 in cell number per week for H1 human embryonic stem cells and 253G1 human induced pluripotent stem cells, respectively. This simple approach to mimick the ECM may have important implications after further optimization to generate lineage-specific products.
Glutamate spillover in C. elegans triggers repetitive behavior through presynaptic activation of MGL-2/mGluR5.
Katz M, Corson F, Keil W,Singhal A, Bae A, Lu Y, Liang Y, Shaham S.
Nat Commun - 10(1) 1882 - doi: 10.1038/s41467-019-09581-4. - 2019
Glutamate is a major excitatory neurotransmitter, and impaired glutamate clearance following synaptic release promotes spillover, inducing extra-synaptic signaling. The effects of glutamate spillover on animal behavior and its neural correlates are poorly understood. We developed a glutamate spillover model in Caenorhabditis elegans by inactivating the conserved glial glutamate transporter GLT-1. GLT-1 loss drives aberrant repetitive locomotory reversal behavior through uncontrolled oscillatory release of glutamate onto AVA, a major interneuron governing reversals. Repetitive glutamate release and reversal behavior require the glutamate receptor MGL-2/mGluR5, expressed in RIM and other interneurons presynaptic to AVA. mgl-2 loss blocks oscillations and repetitive behavior; while RIM activation is sufficient to induce repetitive reversals in glt-1 mutants. Repetitive AVA firing and reversals require EGL-30/Gαq, an mGluR5 effector. Our studies reveal that cyclic autocrine presynaptic activation drives repetitive reversals following glutamate spillover. That mammalian GLT1 and mGluR5 are implicated in pathological motor repetition suggests a common mechanism controlling repetitive behaviors.
Selection Dynamics in Transient Compartmentalization.
Blokhuis A, Lacoste D, Nghe P, Peliti L
Phys. Rev. Lett. - 158101 120(15): - doi: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004972 - 2018
Transient compartments have been recently shown to be able to maintain functional replicators in the context of prebiotic studies. Here, we show that a broad class of selection dynamics is able to achieve this goal. We identify two key parameters, the relative amplification of nonactive replicators (parasites) and the size of compartments. These parameters account for competition and diversity, and the results are relevant to similar multilevel selection problems, such as those found in virus-host ecology and trait group selection.
Coupled catabolism and anabolism in autocatalytic RNA sets.
Arsène S, Ameta S, Lehman N, Griffiths AD, Nghe P.
Nucleic Acids Res. - 46(18) 9660-9666 - doi: 10.1093/nar/gky598. - 2018
The ability to process molecules available in the environment into useable building blocks characterizes catabolism in contemporary cells and was probably critical for the initiation of life. Here we show that a catabolic process in collectively autocatalytic sets of RNAs allows diversified substrates to be assimilated. We modify fragments of the Azoarcus group I intron and find that the system is able to restore the original native fragments by a multi-step reaction pathway. This allows in turn the formation of catalysts by an anabolic process, eventually leading to the accumulation of ribozymes. These results demonstrate that rudimentary self-reproducing RNA systems based on recombination possess an inherent capacity to assimilate an expanded repertoire of chemical resources and suggest that coupled catabolism and anabolism could have arisen at a very early stage in primordial living systems.
Sign epistasis caused by hierarchy within signalling cascades
Nghe P, Kogenaru M, Tans SJ
Nat Commun - 1451 9660-9666 - 10.1038/s41467-018-03644-8. - 2018
The ability to process molecules available in the environment into useable building blocks characterizes catabolism in contemporary cells and was probably critical for the initiation of life. Here we show that a catabolic process in collectively autocatalytic sets of RNAs allows diversified substrates to be assimilated. We modify fragments of the Azoarcus group I intron and find that the system is able to restore the original native fragments by a multi-step reaction pathway. This allows in turn the formation of catalysts by an anabolic process, eventually leading to the accumulation of ribozymes. These results demonstrate that rudimentary self-reproducing RNA systems based on recombination possess an inherent capacity to assimilate an expanded repertoire of chemical resources and suggest that coupled catabolism and anabolism could have arisen at a very early stage in primordial living systems.
Selection Dynamics in Transient Compartmentalization
doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.120.158101
Phys. Rev. Lett. - 120 158101 - doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.120.158101 - 2018
Transient compartments have been recently shown to be able to maintain functional replicators in the context of prebiotic studies. Here, we show that a broad class of selection dynamics is able to achieve this goal. We identify two key parameters, the relative amplification of nonactive replicators (parasites) and the size of compartments. These parameters account for competition and diversity, and the results are relevant to similar multilevel selection problems, such as those found in virus-host ecology and trait group selection.
Innate Immune Signals Induce Anterograde Endosome Transport Promoting MHC Class I Cross-Presentation.
Weimershaus M, Mauvais FX, Saveanu L, Adiko C, Babdor J, Abramova A, Montealegre S, Lawand M, Evnouchidou I, Huber KJ, Chadt A, Zwick M, Vargas P, Dussiot M, Lennon-Dumenil AM, Brocker T, Al-Hasani H, van Endert P.
Cell Reports - 24(13) 3568-3581 - doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2018.08.041 - 2018
Both cross-presentation of antigens by dendritic cells, a key pathway triggering T cell immunity and immune tolerance, and survival of several pathogens residing in intracellular vacuoles are intimately linked to delayed maturation of vesicles containing internalized antigens and microbes. However, how early endosome or phagosome identity is maintained is incompletely understood. We show that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and Fc receptor ligation induces interaction of the GTPase Rab14 with the kinesin KIF16b mediating plus-end-directed microtubule transport of endosomes. As a result, Rab14 recruitment to phagosomes delays their maturation and killing of an internalized pathogen. Enhancing anterograde transport by overexpressing Rab14, promoting the GTP-bound Rab14 state, or inhibiting retrograde transport upregulates cross-presentation. Conversely, reducing Rab14 expression, destabilizing Rab14 endosomes, and inhibiting anterograde microtubule transport by Kif16b knockdown compromise cross-presentation. Therefore, regulation of early endosome trafficking by innate immune signals is a critical parameter in cross-presentation by dendritic cells.
Diversification of human plasmacytoid predendritic cells in response to a single stimulus
Alculumbre SG, Saint-André V1, Di Domizio J, Vargas P, Sirven P, Bost P, Maurin M, Maiuri P, Wery M, Roman MS, Savey L, Touzot M, Terrier B, Saadoun D, Conrad C, Gilliet M, Morillon A, Soumelis V.
Nat Immunol. - 19(1) 63-75 - doi: 10.1038/s41590-017-0012-z - 2018
Innate immune cells adjust to microbial and inflammatory stimuli through a process termed environmental plasticity, which links a given individual stimulus to a unique activated state. Here, we report that activation of human plasmacytoid predendritic cells (pDCs) with a single microbial or cytokine stimulus triggers cell diversification into three stable subpopulations (P1-P3). P1-pDCs (PD-L1+CD80-) displayed a plasmacytoid morphology and specialization for type I interferon production. P3-pDCs (PD-L1-CD80+) adopted a dendritic morphology and adaptive immune functions. P2-pDCs (PD-L1+CD80+) displayed both innate and adaptive functions. Each subpopulation expressed a specific coding- and long-noncoding-RNA signature and was stable after secondary stimulation. P1-pDCs were detected in samples from patients with lupus or psoriasis. pDC diversification was independent of cell divisions or preexisting heterogeneity within steady-state pDCs but was controlled by a TNF autocrine and/or paracrine communication loop. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism for diversity and division of labor in innate immune cells.
Spontaneous migration of cellular aggregates from giant keratocytes to running spheroids
Grégory Beaune, Carles Blanch-Mercader, Stéphane Douezan, Julien Dumond, David Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Damien Cuvelier, Thierry Ondarçuhu, Pierre Sens, Sylvie Dufour, Michael P. Murrell, and Françoise Brochard-Wyart
Cell Sci - 115 (51) 12926-12931 - doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1811348115 - 2018
Despite extensive knowledge on the mechanisms that drive single-cell migration, those governing the migration of cell clusters, as occurring during embryonic development and cancer metastasis, remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the collective migration of cell on adhesive gels with variable rigidity, using 3D cellular aggregates as a model system. After initial adhesion to the substrate, aggregates spread by expanding outward a cell monolayer, whose dynamics is optimal in a narrow range of rigidities. Fast expansion gives rise to the accumulation of mechanical tension that leads to the rupture of cell–cell contacts and the nucleation of holes within the monolayer, which becomes unstable and undergoes dewetting like a liquid film. This leads to a symmetry breaking and causes the entire aggregate to move as a single entity. Varying the substrate rigidity modulates the extent of dewetting and induces different modes of aggregate motion: “giant keratocytes,” where the lamellipodium is a cell monolayer that expands at the front and retracts at the back; “penguins,” characterized by bipedal locomotion; and “running spheroids,” for nonspreading aggregates. We characterize these diverse modes of collective migration by quantifying the flows and forces that drive them, and we unveil the fundamental physical principles that govern these behaviors, which underscore the biological predisposition of living material to migrate, independent of length scale.
Adhesion to nanofibers drives cell membrane remodeling through one-dimensional wetting.
Arthur Charles-Orszag, Feng-Ching Tsai, Daria Bonazzi, Valeria Manriquez, Martin Sachse, Adeline Mallet, Audrey Salles, Keira Melican, Ralitza Staneva, Aurélie Bertin, Corinne Millien, Sylvie Goussard, Pierre Lafaye, Spencer Shorte, Matthieu Piel, Jacomi
Nature Communications - 4450 : - Adhesion to nanofibers drives cell membrane remodeling through one-dimensional wetting. - 2018
The shape of cellular membranes is highly regulated by a set of conserved mechanisms that can be manipulated by bacterial pathogens to infect cells. Remodeling of the plasma membrane of endothelial cells by the bacterium Neisseria meningitidis is thought to be essential during the blood phase of meningococcal infection, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we show that plasma membrane remodeling occurs independently of F-actin, along meningococcal type IV pili fibers, by a physical mechanism that we term ‘one-dimensional’ membrane wetting. We provide a theoretical model that describes the physical basis of one-dimensional wetting and show that this mechanism occurs in model membranes interacting with nanofibers, and in human cells interacting with extracellular matrix meshworks. We propose one-dimensional wetting as a new general principle driving the interaction of cells with their environment at the nanoscale that is diverted by meningococci during infection.

400 publications.