Université PSL

Publications

RECHERCHER

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Efficient laboratory evolution of computationally designed enzymes with low starting activities using fluorescence-activated droplet sorting
Obexer R, Pott M, Zeymer C, Griffiths A, Hilvert D.
Protein Eng Des Sel - 29(9) 355-66 - doi: 10.1093/protein/gzw032 - 2016
De novo biocatalysts with non-natural functionality are accessible by computational enzyme design. The catalytic activities obtained for the initial designs are usually low, but can be optimized significantly by directed evolution. Nevertheless, rate accelerations approaching the level of natural enzymes can only be achieved over many rounds of tedious and time-consuming laboratory evolution. In this work, we show that microfluidic-based screening using fluorescence-activated droplet sorting (FADS) is ideally suited for efficient optimization of designed enzymes with low starting activity, essentially straight out of the computer. We chose the designed retro-aldolase RA95.0, which had been previously evolved by conventional microtiter plate screening, as an example and reoptimized it using the microfluidic-based assay. Our results show that FADS is sufficiently sensitive to detect enzyme activities as low as kcat/Km = 0.5 M(-1)s(-1) The ultra-high throughput of this system makes screening of large mutant libraries possible in which clusters of up to five residues are randomized simultaneously. Thus, combinations of beneficial mutations can be identified directly, leading to large jumps in catalytic activity of up to 80-fold within a single round of evolution. By exploring several evolutionary trajectories in parallel, we identify alternative active site arrangements that exhibit comparably enhanced efficiency but opposite enantioselectivity
Hierarchy and extremes in selections from pools of randomized proteins
Boyer S, Biswas D, Kumar Soshee A, Scaramozzino N, Nizak C2, Rivoire O.
Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA - 113(13) 3482-7 - doi: 10.1073/pnas. - 2016
Variation and selection are the core principles of Darwinian evolution, but quantitatively relating the diversity of a population to its capacity to respond to selection is challenging. Here, we examine this problem at a molecular level in the context of populations of partially randomized proteins selected for binding to well-defined targets. We built several minimal protein libraries, screened them in vitro by phage display, and analyzed their response to selection by high-throughput sequencing. A statistical analysis of the results reveals two main findings. First, libraries with the same sequence diversity but built around different "frameworks" typically have vastly different responses; second, the distribution of responses of the best binders in a library follows a simple scaling law. We show how an elementary probabilistic model based on extreme value theory rationalizes the latter finding. Our results have implications for designing synthetic protein libraries, estimating the density of functional biomolecules in sequence space, characterizing diversity in natural populations, and experimentally investigating evolvability (i.e., the potential for future evolution).
Lineage Tracking for Probing Heritable Phenotypes at Single-Cell Resolution
Denis Cottinet , Florence Condamine, Nicolas Bremond, Andrew D. Griffiths, Paul B. Rainey, J. Arjan G. M. de Visser, Jean Baudry, Jérôme Bibette
Nature Biotechnology - 11(4) e0152395 - doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0152395 - 2016
Determining the phenotype and genotype of single cells is central to understand microbial evolution. DNA sequencing technologies allow the detection of mutants at high resolution, but similar approaches for phenotypic analyses are still lacking. We show that a drop-based millifluidic system enables the detection of heritable phenotypic changes in evolving bacterial populations. At time intervals, cells were sampled and individually compartmentalized in 100 nL drops. Growth through 15 generations was monitored using a fluorescent protein reporter. Amplification of heritable changes–via growth–over multiple generations yields phenotypically distinct clusters reflecting variation relevant for evolution. To demonstrate the utility of this approach, we follow the evolution of Escherichia coli populations during 30 days of starvation. Phenotypic diversity was observed to rapidly increase upon starvation with the emergence of heritable phenotypes. Mutations corresponding to each phenotypic class were identified by DNA sequencing. This scalable lineage-tracking technology opens the door to large-scale phenotyping methods with special utility for microbiology and microbial population biology.
Innate control of actin nucleation determines two distinct migration behaviours in dendritic cells.
Vargas P, Maiuri P, Bretou M, Sáez PJ, Pierobon P, Maurin M, Chabaud M, Lankar D, Obino D, Terriac E, Raab M, Thiam H-R, Brocker T, Kitchen-Goosen SM, Alberts AS, Sunareni P, Xia S, Li R, Voituriez R, Piel M, Lennon-Duménil A-M
Nat. Cell Biol. - 18(1): 43-53 - DOI: 10.1016/j.jim.2015.12.005 - 2016
Dendritic cell (DC) migration in peripheral tissues serves two main functions: antigen sampling by immature DCs, and chemokine-guided migration towards lymphatic vessels (LVs) on maturation. These migratory events determine the efficiency of the adaptive immune response. Their regulation by the core cell locomotion machinery has not been determined. Here, we show that the migration of immature DCs depends on two main actin pools: a RhoA-mDia1-dependent actin pool located at their rear, which facilitates forward locomotion; and a Cdc42-Arp2/3-dependent actin pool present at their front, which limits migration but promotes antigen capture. Following TLR4-MyD88-induced maturation, Arp2/3-dependent actin enrichment at the cell front is markedly reduced. Consequently, mature DCs switch to a faster and more persistent mDia1-dependent locomotion mode that facilitates chemotactic migration to LVs and lymph nodes. Thus, the differential use of actin-nucleating machineries optimizes the migration of immature and mature DCs according to their specific function.
Deterministic patterns in cell motility
Ido Lavi, Matthieu Piel, Ana-Maria Lennon-Duménil , Raphaël Voituriez and Nir S. Gov
Nature Physics - 12 1146–1152 - DOI: : 10.1038/NPHYS3836 - 2016
Cell migration paths are generally described as random walks, associated with both intrinsic and extrinsic noise. However, complex cell locomotion is not merely related to such fluctuations, but is often determined by the underlying machinery. Cell motility is driven mechanically by actin and myosin, two molecular components that generate contractile forces. Other cell functions make use of the same components and, therefore, will compete with the migratory apparatus. Here, we propose a physical model of such a competitive system, namely dendritic cells whose antigen capture function and migratory ability are coupled by myosin II. The model predicts that this coupling gives rise to a dynamic instability, whereby cells switch from persistent migration to unidirectional self-oscillation, through a Hopf bifurcation. Cells can then switch to periodic polarity reversals through a homoclinic bifurcation. These predicted dynamic regimes are characterized by robust features that we identify through in vitro trajectories of dendritic cells over long timescales and distances. We expect that competition for limited resources in other migrating cell types can lead to similar deterministic migration modes.
Perinuclear Arp2/3-driven actin polymerization enables nuclear deformation to facilitate cell migration through complex environments.
Thiam HR, Vargas P, Carpi N, Crespo CL, Raab M, Terriac E, King MC, Jacobelli J, Alberts AS, Stradal T, Lennon-Dumenil AM, Piel M.
Nat Commun - 7 10997 - doi: 10.1038/ncomms10997. - 2016
Cell migration has two opposite faces: although necessary for physiological processes such as immune responses, it can also have detrimental effects by enabling metastatic cells to invade new organs. In vivo, migration occurs in complex environments and often requires a high cellular deformability, a property limited by the cell nucleus. Here we show that dendritic cells, the sentinels of the immune system, possess a mechanism to pass through micrometric constrictions. This mechanism is based on a rapid Arp2/3-dependent actin nucleation around the nucleus that disrupts the nuclear lamina, the main structure limiting nuclear deformability. The cells' requirement for Arp2/3 to pass through constrictions can be relieved when nuclear stiffness is decreased by suppressing lamin A/C expression. We propose a new role for Arp2/3 in three-dimensional cell migration, allowing fast-moving cells such as leukocytes to rapidly and efficiently migrate through narrow gaps, a process probably important for their function.
Arc/Arg3.1 governs inflammatory dendritic cell migration from the skin and thereby controls T cell activation.
Ufer F, Vargas P, Engler JB, Tintelnot J, Schattling B, Winkler H, Bauer S,Kursawe N, Willing A, Keminer O, Ohana O, Salinas-Riester G, Pless O, Kuhl D, Friese MA.
Sci Immunol - 1(3) 8665 - doi: 10.1126/sciimmunol.aaf8665. - 2016
Skin-migratory dendritic cells (migDCs) are pivotal antigen-presenting cells that continuously transport antigens to draining lymph nodes and regulate immune responses. However, identification of migDCs is complicated by the lack of distinguishing markers, and it remains unclear which molecules determine their migratory capacity during inflammation. We show that, in the skin, the neuronal plasticity molecule activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein/activity-regulated gene 3.1 (Arc/Arg3.1) was strictly confined to migDCs. Mechanistically, Arc/Arg3.1 was required for accelerated DC migration during inflammation because it regulated actin dynamics through nonmuscle myosin II. Accordingly, Arc/Arg3.1-dependent DC migration was critical for mounting T cell responses in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Thus, Arc/Arg3.1 was restricted to migDCs in the skin and drove fast DC migration by exclusively coordinating cytoskeletal changes in response to inflammatory challenges. These findings commend Arc/Arg3.1 as a universal switch in migDCs that may be exploited to selectively modify immune responses.
Deterministic patterns in cell motility
Ido Lavi, Matthieu Piel, Ana-Maria Lennon-Duménil, Raphaël Voituriez & Nir S. Gov
Nature Physics - 12 1146–1152 - DOI : 10.1038/nphys3836 - 2016
Cell migration paths are generally described as random walks, associated with both intrinsic and extrinsic noise. However, complex cell locomotion is not merely related to such fluctuations, but is often determined by the underlying machinery. Cell motility is driven mechanically by actin and myosin, two molecular components that generate contractile forces. Other cell functions make use of the same components and, therefore, will compete with the migratory apparatus. Here, we propose a physical model of such a competitive system, namely dendritic cells whose antigen capture function and migratory ability are coupled by myosin II. The model predicts that this coupling gives rise to a dynamic instability, whereby cells switch from persistent migration to unidirectional self-oscillation, through a Hopf bifurcation. Cells can then switch to periodic polarity reversals through a homoclinic bifurcation. These predicted dynamic regimes are characterized by robust features that we identify through in vitro trajectories of dendritic cells over long timescales and distances. We expect that competition for limited resources in other migrating cell types can lead to similar deterministic migration modes.
On-Chip Quantitative Measurement of Mechanical Stresses During Cell Migration with Emulsion Droplets.
D Molino, S Quignard, C Gruget, F Pincet, Y Chen, M Piel, J Fattaccioli
Scientific Reports - 6 29113 - DOI : 10.1038/srep29113 - 2016
The ability of immune cells to migrate within narrow and crowded spaces is a critical feature involved in various physiological processes from immune response to metastasis. Several in-vitro techniques have been developed so far to study the behaviour of migrating cells, the most recent being based on the fabrication of microchannels within which cells move. To address the question of the mechanical stress a cell is able to produce during the encounter of an obstacle while migrating, we developed a hybrid microchip made of parallel PDMS channels in which oil droplets are sparsely distributed and serve as deformable obstacles. We thus show that cells strongly deform droplets while passing them. Then, we show that the microdevice can be used to study the influence of drugs on migration at the population level. Finally, we describe a quantitative analysis method of the droplet deformation that allows measuring in real-time the mechanical stress exerted by a single cell. The method presented herein thus constitutes a powerful analytical tool for cell migration studies under confinement.
Arc/Arg3.1 governs inflammatory dendritic cell migration from the skin and thereby controls T cell activation.
Ufer F, Vargas P, Engler JB, Tintelnot J, Schattling B, Winkler H, Bauer S, Kursawe N, Willing A, Keminer O, Ohana O, Salinas-Riester G, Pless O, Kuhl D, Friese MA.
Sci Immunol - 1(3) - DOI: 10.1126/sciimmunol.aaf8665 - 2016
Skin-migratory dendritic cells (migDCs) are pivotal antigen-presenting cells that continuously transport antigens to draining lymph nodes and regulate immune responses. However, identification of migDCs is complicated by the lack of distinguishing markers, and it remains unclear which molecules determine their migratory capacity during inflammation. We show that, in the skin, the neuronal plasticity molecule activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein/activity-regulated gene 3.1 (Arc/Arg3.1) was strictly confined to migDCs. Mechanistically, Arc/Arg3.1 was required for accelerated DC migration during inflammation because it regulated actin dynamics through nonmuscle myosin II. Accordingly, Arc/Arg3.1-dependent DC migration was critical for mounting T cell responses in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Thus, Arc/Arg3.1 was restricted to migDCs in the skin and drove fast DC migration by exclusively coordinating cytoskeletal changes in response to inflammatory challenges. These findings commend Arc/Arg3.1 as a universal switch in migDCs that may be exploited to selectively modify immune responses.

346 publications.